Asma Khalid

Asma Khalid is a campaign reporter focusing on the intersection of demographics and politics in the 2016 election. Her stories range from exploring how Puerto Rico's fiscal crisis could influence the Florida vote to interviewing the "new millennials" — the Obama-era kids who will be casting their first vote for president in 2016.

Before joining NPR's Election Team, Asma covered politics for Boston's NPR station WBUR.

She's also reported on a number of breaking news stories, including the Boston Marathon bombings and the trial of James "Whitey" Bulger.

Asma got her start in radio through an internship at BBC Newshour in London during grad school. But, she also owes her journalism education to NPR. For a few years after college, she was a producer for NPR's Morning Edition.

Alison Lu was in shock on election night. The Harvard Business School student had voted for Hillary Clinton, and she couldn't fathom how Donald Trump had managed to win the presidency.

She opened her Facebook page searching for answers, but she didn't find any Trump-supporting friends. "None of them [Trump voters] showed themselves on my Facebook feed," she says.

These days the Web can seem like a dark place, filled with internet trolls and divisive discourse. But the man who invented the World Wide Web 28 years ago is still optimistic (sort of).

That man is Tim Berners-Lee, and on Tuesday he was awarded the prestigious Turing Award for his invention. It's an honor thought of as a Nobel Prize for computer science that comes with a $1 million award from Google.

What if your friend the robot could tell what you're thinking, without you saying a word?

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